Enhanced Care package for Care home residents results in decreased A & E visits

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In what seems to be great news, coming from the care home sector, a project involving an enhanced service package aimed at improving quality of life for care home residents has yielded positive results. The project has been linked to significantly reduced accident and emergency visits.

The care home tenants who reside in Rushcliffe Clinical Commissioning Group’s area were the subject of the experiment. They were provided with an enhanced care package, introduced in April 2014, which meant residents had regular visits from a named GP and independent support from Age UK Nottingham and Nottinghamshire. The package was delivered by Principia, an NHS multi-specialty community provider.

Another factor that influenced the positive result of the project was the specialized support provided to care center managers and nurses. The support included training courses and signposting to existing specialist community services through a peer network.

The statistics indicated a substantial decrease of 29% in A&E visits compared to similar care home residents in other parts of the country. Emergency admits also decreased by 23%.

The research was carefully conducted by comparing the data of 588 residents in 23 care homes in and around Rushcliffe from 2014-16 with outcomes experienced by 588 controls living elsewhere in the country.

Special care was taken to judiciously match the participants by age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic deprivation, health conditions and type of care home.

The foundation’s report said that the positive results observed in the enhanced package group were “most likely” to be the result of the higher quality care they received.

Here is hoping this approach can be replicated in other parts of the country moving forward!

Lack of manpower in the care home sector, opens the door for expats looking to make a buck on the side.

The care home crisis in the UK is now manifesting itself as a severe lack of qualified manpower for the job.

Senior couple at home with many billsDue to the extremely high turnover in the sector several barmaids, builders and even bankrupt business men are flying into Britain to cash in on the lucrative opportunity that has surfaced due to lack of personnel. This has resulted in several elderly individuals in need of care being at the mercy of complete strangers who have only completed days of training.

 

British agencies are responsible for attracting these individuals with the promise of a substantial earnings and free housing. Some of the expats flying in from Spain are reportedly earning a whopping 1,700 pounds for a fortnights worth of work. To make matters worse, there seems to be an open consensus among these expats that they are purely driven by the financial incentive and are not keen to take care of the helpless patients.

As reported earlier, the care home and social care industry is facing major crisis in the UK at the moment, but these new revelations could well be a tipping point. Several care homes have recently face closure due to the lack of funds and workers, which have resulted in rising cost for families with relatives at the facilities. The British care home industry is heavily reliant on its workers and the recent developments seem to reiterate that fact.

Several of these care workers who perform activities like intimate washing, dressing as well as supervising the taking of medication are listed as self-employed and that means they are not controlled by the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The importance of appropriate research into picking the right care home which houses qualified staffis highlighted by recent news making headlines. Websites such as bestukcarehomes.com are great tools for families to connect with and compare different accredited care home facilities that provide care services for all kinds of circumstances.

 

Communication and compassion drives care industry forward

What do you enjoy the most about working in care industry?

The world of healthcare and working in this industry offers many people rewards and benefits.

There is never a dull moment and it is rare to experience the same day twice.
Quite often people will ask what do you do for a living and when I tell them that I look after the elderly and specialise in those who have Alzheimer’s or a form of dementia. Often I get the reply “oh I admire what you do, I couldn’t do that you must have a lot of patience”. I know lots of healthcare professionals out there get the same reaction I’ve heard it a lot after almost 10 years in the profession. Sometimes it even makes me smile because yes there are a lot of people who could not do the job, you have to be a special kind of person.
For me I am passionate about every person having the care that they want and deserve. It didn’t take me long to work out in this profession that there are a lot of people with Alzheimer’s and dementia who don’t get listened to properly. I expect carers to listen and take their time wherever possible especially when they are looking after a person with Alzheimer’s.

 

What are the most important qualities a care home professional should have?

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I believe that great health care professionals should have excellent communication skills that include being able to listen and speak clearly to residents and their families. They should be able to feel compassion and provide comfort and overall have empathy for the person they are caring for.
Health care can be stressful, long shifts and quite often the professional may encounter many traumatic situations. They need to be able to work without allowing the stress to cause them personal harm. Great health care professional always respect people and rules they should always be mindful of their employers confidentiality policies and respect the different cultures and traditions.

 

What is your personal motivation to work in the care home industry?

Caring is an active engagement in the total well-being of the person – putting the person’s needs at the centre of everything you do for them. This includes promoting, preserving and encouraging their capabilities and interests.

care-home-Christine ElsleyTo achieve this we need to share experiences with our colleagues and provide additional information for those staff that have an interest and enthusiasm for person-centred care. People understand better when they relate key ideas to their own life and for many they learn while they are doing.

I feel very privileged to be able to work with many individuals who share their lives with people on a daily basis and go that extra mile to help others.

 

Christine Elsley is a lead practitioner in Dementia Care and has a degree in Dementia studies. Most of all, she is passionate about people with dementia being looked after with dignity.

High-standard care homes should only accept good quality food

What do you enjoy the most about working in care home industry?

It has to be the residents. I love engaging with them and their families, discovering the tiny details about them;  what they have done in their lives, what they like to do now, what makes them happy and most importantly as a Chef, what they like to eat! This is the key to offering truly personalised care – if you don’t know someone how can you care for them? Our food menus are controlled at the home level so I’m always chatting about our recipes with the residents, discussing their favourite bakes and making sure we cater for their tastes.

I also love the fact that our home, Parker Meadows, is at the heart of our local community and we are always welcoming visitors. I never get bored because there’s so much going on – the other week we had a red carpet reception for a premier of the Ping Pong documentary!

 

Kane Bassett 2

What are the most important qualities a care home professional should have?

I think our company values sum this up really well – kindness, integrity, empathy, trust and respect. Without these qualities you won’t be able to provide the care that all older people deserve. At the heart of care must be the wish to get to know the person that you are caring for, you need to take time with each resident, have patience and make sure that their individual needs are met.

And lastly I think there has to be a genuine desire to make a difference to the lives of the people that you care for and on a larger scale to society in general, changing perceptions about older people and the care industry. This isn’t just a job, it’s a vocation and something that you do because you love it!

 

To all the people out there looking for a care home for themselves or their loved ones, what is the best advice you would offer?

Pay attention to the atmosphere in the home – does it feel like a home? Are the staff friendly and welcoming? An active home is a happy home so when you visit can you see lots of things going on or posters advertising future events? Check to see evidence of these activities, are there photos or does the home have a Facebook page or Twitter account where you can see what actually happens? Can you stay and participate in an activity so you can have a taste of what life is like at the home?

Try the food -this is a must! Fresh, home cooked food is essential for any home and a key to a happy, healthy life for anyone, whatever age. Walk past the kitchen, can you smell freshly baked bread or what they are cooking for dinner. Have high standards and only accept good quality food.

Kane Bassett

 

Kane Bassett Biography:

Kane Bassett is the Chef Manager at Parker Meadows Care Home in Fareham. Parker Meadows is a Gracewell Healthcare home. Kane joined Gracewell healthcare in June 2012 and has an NVQ 3 in both Kitchen Larder and Patisserie and a Level 5 Diploma in Management and Leadership Health and Social Care. Kane is now embarking on a Foundation Degree is Hospitality Management.

Caroline urges for more resident-centred care homes

What are the most important qualities a care home professional should have?

The answers are all in the title really.

Firstly, they need to care.  They need to care about all of the people they work with, both colleagues and residents. They should be compassionate and attentive. Care home professionals need to find out about each other and those they care for as individuals.  Everyone needs to ensure they know what is meant by ‘person-centred care’.  It’s about everyone in that environment. They need to be egalitarian and treat other people, fairly, with respect and kindness.  Anyone working with other people needs to be in touch with their own feelings, to be able to empathise with others and have good listening skills. They are not looking after relics in a museum they are caring for and working with some very special people.

Secondly, the place they work in is a ‘home’ not just a work-place. People who work in care homes should emanate a sense of intimate security to add to the atmosphere of being at home.  In just the same way as they run their own homes they need to be flexible in their organisation of meals etc. to allow for personal choices and requirements. Staff need to bring a feeling of domesticity in to the building, where everyone is involved in helping to get the ‘jobs’ done.  Maintaining the opportunities for meaningful occupation.  A care home should not feel like a hospital or a hotel.

Care home professionals should be professional and by that I mean that they should respect their own profession.  They should be keen learners that are motivated to keep up to date with information available, on research and models of care etc.  We need reflective practitioners who are not afraid to admit that they have made mistakes; that they are still learning, along with the rest of us. We need people who are resourceful, open to new innovations and ready to change their models of care for the benefit of those using their services. Changes cannot happen if they are treated like a ‘quick fix’. It takes time to ensure that the desired outcomes are recognised and worked towards as a long term goal.  It takes a team of professional people who recognise the strengths and weaknesses of each member and encourages each person to take part in achieving those outcomes.

We are asking for a lot from care home professionals, we need to recognise this and ensure that we are giving back what they deserve.  Allowing care staff to work set hours, so that they can plan their home lives accordingly, and allowing them to be salaried would be a good start.

 

What are some of the areas that the care home industry can improve?

My work takes me into a variety of care home settings and the ones that strike me as getting it right are those where they work as a team.  I’m talking about housekeepers, gardeners, activity co-ordinators, kitchen staff, management, office workers, everybody working together to give the best service they can.  These are the places where I can recognise true person-centred care, where everyone matters.

To enable all of the staff to give of their best, there is a real need for training. The government are making headway through Dementia Friends to ensure that the general public dementia aware.  This puts the onus on our profession to ensure that all staff are trained beyond the stage of ‘dementia aware’.  It is beneficial for the care home to have staff fully trained in Cognitive Stimulation and confident in the appropriate usage of Reality Orientation and Reminiscence Therapy.

Care home managers triumph when they invite staff, visitors and residents to look at the home with new eyes, encouraging feedback on any improvements that can be made to the environment.  Looking for ways of enabling residents to remain independent for longer or items which will stimulate feelings or conversations.  It’s wonderful to see these ideas in practice in some of the homes I have visited.   This is where staff can be at their most resourceful, lots of these ideas are cheap and cheerful.  The environment can benefit dramatically when we implement small changes which will enhance the quality of life for those living and working in the home.

 

What is the key issue facing the care home industry in this country?

I know I’m going to leave myself wide open to an onslaught of disagreements here.  I know so many people will say it is a lack of funding.  Whilst I acknowledge that this is a factor, I honestly think the key issue in this country is the number of care home owners and managers who truly believe they are doing a good job when the simple truth of the matter is that they are not delivering person-centred care in the true sense.

There are, of course, lots of owners and managers in the industry who are doing a fabulous job, but, if you asked them what they would do to improve their care homes, they wouldn’t look at you ‘gob-smacked’ and tell you that they believe they have one of the best in the area.  They are the people who will immediately give you a list of goals they would like to incorporate in to their homes and also tell you what research they would like to know more about.

Sadly, there are still too many who have been doing the job for a long time and haven’t learnt anything new in the process, they are still constantly playing music from the 1930s – 1940s because they believe that is what their residents want to listen to. They haven’t asked the residents. They fail to explore the possibility of someone liking Cliff Richard, Barbara Streisand, The Isley Brothers, or, heaven forbid, Abba,  (dare I even mention Pink Floyd, Led Zepplin or London Grammar)and yet there are many people living in care homes today who’s popular music tastes don’t include ‘Roll out the barrel’.  Personal tastes in music are as varied as the different genres available.

So many managers just want to ‘tick the box’ for training their employees in dementia care.  They only want the very basic awareness course, they’re not interested in courses about ‘Activities’ because they already do bingo twice a week and they have someone in once a fortnight to run armchair exercises. (Oh, and once a month a man comes in and sings to them).  They don’t have art materials, or poetry books, a video player in the lounge, or pens to do the crosswords in the paper. There are no dolls to be seen, or pets in the home.  In fact there is very little of any interest in the rooms at all.  The managers will ask ‘Do you do a course for behaviour problems, or how to restrain difficult residents?’  They don’t appreciate that improved environments will reduce these problems drastically, allowing them to concentrate on the niche requirements of individuals (perhaps something as simple as a doll or teddy bear to cuddle, or someone to talk to for a while at certain times of the day). They have very little understanding of how individuals with dementia can be helped to make sense of what is going on around them.

Activity Co-ordinators are crying out for training which is relevant to their role, their managers however, are spending the money on flower arrangements in the reception area.  They haven’t even thought about finding out if there is a lady who did the flower arranging for church each Sunday living in their home. There are too many care homes still working to timetables, with the importance placed on what the home looks like to visitors rather than models of care which have been adapted to suit the choices of their current residents.

If we wish to make any inroads into improved care for older people we need to listen to what people want for themselves in their new homes, as well as employing staff who engage with customers, people who endeavour to understand and facilitate the personal needs of those living with dementia.

care-home-caroline-benham

 

Caroline Benham has extensive experience in the care home industry, worked for Anchor in the past and currently a volunteer for Alzheimer’s. She is currently studying towards a degree on Dementia Studies while working as a dementia care trainer.

 

Tips for finding the right care home from industry insider Janis McFarlane

What do you enjoy the most about working in care home industry?
I enjoy working with people from all walks of life, residents and their families, managers and staff and related health professionals. No two days are ever the same; each day brings something different and a new challenge to be solved. I particularly enjoy teaching staff and showing them that excellent quality care can and is provided within care homes. Observing staff develop their confidence, skills and meaningful relations with residents brings a smile to my face and gives me the “oomph” to carry on promoting care in care homes, deal with suppliers, develop policies and manage the accounts!

What are the most important qualities a care home professional should have?Apartment building in the city with a spectacular sky
A genuine desire to care, we can teach our staff many things including how to be a professional care person, we cannot teach staff how to be “caring” that is inbuilt in the person.
Respect for other peoples beliefs and choices in life whether we agree or not, being able to support someone to carry on with their wishes that you don’t personally agree with is difficult especially for young care givers.
Compassion, understanding and patience all very easy to say, but far more difficult to deliver if they are not inherent qualities.
The ability to work with the ethos, we work in our residents’ homes they do not live in our work place. Lastly, a sense of humour, the ability to enjoy and have pride in being a professional care giver is essential.
To all the people out there looking for a care home for themselves or their loved ones, what is the best advice you would offer? 
Visit many homes and visit the same home on different days at different times without the need for an appointment with the manager. Speak with residents of the home if possible; find out if they enjoy living there. Observe the staff interactions with the residents and go by your own instinct and feelings. Ask many questions and go prepared with a list of all you want to know no matter how trivial you may think they are, every little detail is important to you and your loved one.
If you were given money and resources to set up a research group, what would you research on the UK care home industry?
Where do all the teaspoons go? Only joking!
Possibly the healing of pressure ulcers that have not developed in the care home or the experiences of relatives concerning “a good death”. I think care homes bench mark themselves against external standards of other organisations and there are many areas of care that external organisations should bench mark against good care homes.

What is the key issue facing the care home industry in this country?
Finance, sustainability and a wider understanding publically of what we do well, what we are expected and required to do, what we wish to do and the financial restraints we face in being able to deliver what we are capable of doing. We are caring for more complex care needs not just in elderly care, we have seen an increase in the need for care of younger people with long term complex needs as a result of trauma and substance misuse entering care homes, we can deliver the care, we can meet their needs however we need reasonable fee structures to enable us to do so. A healthy dose of respect for our services wouldn’t go amiss and whilst bad news sells newspapers a readdressing of the balance of good news stories would be appreciated!

care-home-Janis McFarlane

Janis McFarlane has worked in the care sector for 33 years, she was also trained as a registered general nurse in Fife and worked within the NHS in Fife and Forth Valley in acute areas before embarking on a journey over the last 23 years within the independent care sector that has seen many, many changes in that time. During that time, she has worked as a home manager, regional and senior regional manager and her current role is Director of Operations with The Holmes Care (Group) Ltd. Her passion is end of life care, we don’t get a second chance to get this right, and to be with someone at the end of their life is a privilege. Her aim is to continue to break down myths and barriers surrounding what happens in a care home and to facilitate our managers and their teams through learning and empowerment to provide the very best experience and memories for residents and their families that we possibly can.

Dr. Raja shares his passion and knowledge with CHJ

What do you enjoy the most about working in care home industry?

For me, working in the care industry is a passion and a vocation giving me an opportunity to make a positive difference to the lives of vulnerable people every day whilst affording me a tremendous amount of satisfaction and achievement. Of course, it is incredibly challenging but because of the diversity and uniqueness of every person we support and the situations faced, no one day is the same and its great to be able to apply my passion and creativity with a team equally as dedicated and driven, to achieve positive outcomes.
What is the key issue facing the care home industry in this country?

Senior couple at home with many bills

Clearly the main headline grabber is rightly the underfunding of the sector whilst costs escalate. This takes providing excellent services to the breaking point where staff aren’t paid meaningfully and services cannot be further invested in to improve. To make matters worse, the ever changing and ever increasing burdens of bureaucracy and red tape are stifling at best and confusing and demotivating at worst.

There are examples of good quality services that have closed and are facing distress. Staff morale and improvements within others are problematic and the media’s negative portrayal of the sector is disheartening. The threats and challenges from all sides diminish further the capacity and resilience to continue the fight to improve the lives of the most vulnerable in society. Everybody in the sector is affected from front line care staff through management to owners and directors. In fact the sector deserves credit more than ever for its compassion, warmth and care when it feels very exploitative since so much is built upon the extra mile….. above and beyond that is given by those, most often women, that enter the profession because of a heartfelt commitment to caring.

In a world where austerity rules supreme where government support is reducing and health costs are rising, how challenging has it been for the care home industry? What are some steps you home have taken to manage through the current climate of economic uncertainty?


We have focussed our efforts even more on being closer to service users and front line staff and to empower and support them to assist in maintaining excellent relationships and communication which helps to improve the service experienced by all. We have applied technology to take the burden of many aspects that previously distracted from the time and costs of managing and administering the service including introduction of computer systems, iPads and mobile phones for remote staff which link in with planning and finance.

We have streamlined and restructured our management and moved more people from the office out into the places where people receive care and support and have adopted management functions that break away from service lines but are more responsive in terms of the support people and the organisation needs.

What are some of the areas that the care home industry can improve?

Individual homes and organisations have often been isolated and very bunkered in their outlook and it is now more important than ever for greater unity in the sector. From keeping in touch with local providers, sharing knowledge and resources through to formal membership of local and national trade associations, will help keep knowledge up to date with best and innovative practice whilst possibly opening up opportunities for growth and development and reduction of costs and improving quality as a result.

We as a sector need to celebrate success better. So much happens day in day out within our services we provide yet we too are modest and humble to the point that the only stories that are heard are the bad ones. We should shout from the rooftops about our achievements and success and make sure the local community is engaged and aware of what we do. So many of us hold and take part in Open days, craft fairs, are involved with local churches, colleges and other community groups and activities for example but how many of these feature in news articles let alone interviews?

A strong unified voice representing providers in the sector, sending clear messages to stakeholders including the public as well as commissioners and the government is needed now more than ever and Care England will undoubtedly build on the success of the National Care Association and the English Community Care Association following merger on the 1st january 2014 and will help shape the sector in a way that works for service users and service providers.

 

Care-home-asif-raja

 

Dr. Asif Raja bio:

A lifelong commitment to health and social care has seen Dr Raja apply himself to make a positive difference as a founder and Managing Director of SummerCare. He has championed improvements in the quality of services and is a Director of the National Care Association, a Board Member of the Care England Transition Board, trustee of Shields people parliament, Board Member of the National Leadership Forum and a member of the steering group of the Driving up Quality Alliance.

care-home-great british care awardsHe was recognised as the Best Employer in the country by The Great British Care Awards in 2013 as well as for excellence in customer service in the 2013 Business Awards as well as for his contribution to the community in the 2012 Business Awards.  A prominent national contribution has seen him recognised as one of the top 30 Social Care Leaders in the country as well as a Care Personality in the National Care Awards 2012.

Care industry entrepreneur Udhi Silva emphasises ‘cost control’

 

What do you enjoy the most about working in care home industry?

Albeit I support the care industry with cost savings what I love about this industry is the dedication and passion those people that work in care settings have for their clients. I am honestly overwhelmed by some of the nurses, managers and carers I have met and the extent that they treat their clients as though they are their own family. It is very rare to come across people who have such admiration for the work they do and a lot of other industries can benefit from learning about this. One thing that is evident within the corporate side of the industry is that attention to standards is second to none.

 

What are some of the areas that the care home industry can improve?

Cost control. Over the last couple of years we have seen some fantastic organisations go under due to bad management and a neglect on resources and poor financial management. I have worked with several multi site and individual care homes and I regularly uncover savings in excess off 20-50% off their janitorial supplies, stationery, toners and utilities. These funds can be reinvested back into the client care to support the needs of our demanding population. Operators need to be more vigilant and focus on controlling cost without compromising on quality.

 

What are some steps you home have taken to manage through the current climate of economic uncertainty?

Organisations should adopt savings experts like www.medical-supermarket.com who aim to work with care operators to determine the best value solutions on reducing procurement and sourcing costs and reducing time spent on ordering. Pennies make the pounds and a lot of operators get blinded by trying to struggle to win cost effective deals off the local authorities and then fail to evaluate where back office costs can be reduced without impacting the cost and service for the clients.

 

care-home-Udhi SilvaUdhi Silva, Entrepreneur, Director and Co Founder of Medical Supermarket. HealthCare’s largest one stop shop for consumables, services and equipment.

The first interview with expert!

We are very excited to launch ‘Interview with Experts’ column with an in-depth interview with Daniel Tidmarsh. During the interview, he talked about several key areas of the care home industry, primarily focusing on the human capital side of the business.

What are the most important qualities a care home professional should have?

From my personal experience to work within the care sector and provide an adequate care service I personally believe that one would need the following traits to qualify as a care home professional:

Enthusiasm is one of the most important assets, staff must focus on the job at all times.

Compassion and humanity has to be on the forefront of a nurse’s or member of care staff’s mind. What they do every day has a massive importance on the quality of other people’s lives. They have the clinical expertise, compassion and humanity with which to shape the care and support system which we all take for granted.

Empathy is such a powerful communication tool, 9 times out of 10 it is misunderstood and underused. Effective empathetic communication increases the therapeutic effect of the carer-client relationship massively & is more important than most people realise.

All care givers must have patience with all their service users, there will always be frustrating & difficult situations to deal with, however without the ability to be patient and take a step back the quality of care will be affected massively.

One important characteristic of a carer is the ability to take direction and to work on their own initiative. They must take responsibility for their own actions and above all act in the correct manner adhering to policy’s and procedures laid out by government.

 

What are some of the areas that the care home industry can improve?

Right across the sector in my honest opinion there are fundamental issues that are in need of addressing before the sector as a whole can improve to the level that the general public determine as acceptable and a few areas that need addressing includes funding, wages, training, retention, facilities, listen to clients, families & the closest professionals to the person to ascertain there accurate needs.


To all the people out there looking for a care home for themselves or their loved ones, what is the best advice you would offer?

Some of the best ideas for taking care of  your loved ones often come from other carers, the formula is quite a simple & with the use of technology today, quite an obvious one as well. The internet should and must be your first port of call. Here are a few suggestions I believe will help you no end:

  • Investigate, Investigate, Investigate & use the internet to find out about a home’s quality!
  • Check the CQC reports, they will save you lots of time straight away.
  • Talk to the current residents to see what they have to say about their care and the staff that care for them.
  • The best time to visit a nursing home is around 6 p.m. on a Saturday. Dinner has been served, few if any managers will be in the facility, and it’s likely that you’ll get a true reflection of how the home is run when lowly staffed.
  • What should you look for….. staffing, staffing, staffing. I recommend for a daytime staff patient ratio should be around one to five.
  • Find out if the nursing home uses agency staff and how often they are used. Homes usually use agency staff when they’re desperate short of staff. Sometimes, the agency staffs have to care for 30 or 40 residents they have never even met before.

 

You have spoken very passionately about the job and this industry. What is your personal motivation to work in the care home industry?

I have a younger sister who suffers with a disability that affects girls called Rett Syndrome, her disability has demobilised her completely. She cannot walk, talk, feed herself and she is incontinent but despite all of this she doesn’t let it bring her down, she is always smiling and laughing in her own little world. She is my inspiration for everything thing I do, not just the reason I work in the care industry. If I can make her life a tiny bit better by either putting on her favourite music and dancing around with her or just buying her favourite treat I will 100% do it, she is a beautiful person both inside and out and she makes me want to better myself to make her proud. That’s my reason for being so passionate about the care industry because I live it every day of my life knowing that maybe one day my Mellissa may have to go into a care facility. It is a very real and personal target for me to try my very best to make the care industry a better industry for everyone involved.

 

What do you enjoy the most about working in care home industry?

Job satisfaction, knowing that you’ve helped someone to achieve something that they may not have been able to do without you being there!

 

care-home-Daniel Tidmarsh

A bit about Daniel Tidmarsh

Since leaving school, Daniel has worked effortlessly, learning from professionals and developing his skills through real life experiences. He is a self motivated and driven with a passion to succeed, thrives on a challenge and under pressure.

As a director of Health Care HR, the company was established to be unique in the world of Health Care recruitment & staff training. The main company ethos & aims being driven by the quality of care and standard of living for service users and not for profits as many companies within this industry. For more information on their services please visit online at www.hruk.biz or call 0845 500 4901.

CQC allowed 4000 care homes to break the law

 

care-home-CQC allowed 4000 care homes to break the law

More than 4000 care homes are being allowed by regulators to break the law, with no registered manager in charge of all residents at homes. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has turned a blind eye to the failing, even hough its chief executive has admitted that said such homes are far more likely to be putting vulnerable people at risk.

There are more than 3900 care homes in the market operating without a registered manager according to a recent report to CQC. Registered managers of care homes are supposed to be held accountable for the quality of services in care homes and be held accountable for failings.

CQC chief executive David Behan said, in a recent interview,  that the organisation is preparing to use powers of prosecution against persistent offenders including issuing fines. He insisted, homes without a registered manager have very high levels of non-compliance and it is not acceptable to run a home without a registered manager in place and to do so will result in a sanction.