Top 10 Films with Heroes Who are Over 60 Years Old

 

It happens to all of us. It’s as certain as taxes and the tacky antics of reality television ‘stars.’  We will all die one day. Now flashback as far as you can…five years, a decade, two or more and see how much has changed. Do you like the same music? Do you support the same political party? Are you with someone you love, or have you lost your ability to simply feel said emotion. Time takes its toll, and in the end, what we don’t learn from its passage predicts our inability to deal with what’s ahead. Here is the list of top 10 films about Old People:

care-homes-films

10        Gran Torino

9          The Curious Case of Benjamin Button

8          Harry and Tonto

7          Tokyo Story

6          Tatie Danielle

5          Strangers in Good Company

4          The Straight Story

3          Up

2          Away from Her

1          The Up Series

How to look for a care home

 

Finding-care-homes

When searching for a care home locally, whether it is for yourself or your loved ones, it is utmost important that the person feels comfortable in their choice and that the home has the absolute right ambiance as well as facilities to meet all required needs. In the UK alone, there are more than thousands of care homes available providing various types of care. Subsequently, there are many ways to find the right care home one needs; major care home providers offers search services and many other directory services out there can help as well, for instance, Bupa, Sunrise and CareUK all provide excellent customer services.

Many people would prefer to phone or write to a number of homes and ask about the level of care provided, the fees and the waiting list. On top of the information collected, it is also very important to visit the homes that seem promising. Our editor Ray Stephens have recently found a specialised online service from bestukcarehomes.com that helps people looking for care homes around the UK.

Last but not least, one should always check the quality inspection reports from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in England, the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW) or the Regulation and Quality Improvement Authority (RQIA) in Northern Ireland.

Pesticides exposure linked to Alzheimer’s disease

 

old people pesicide

A study was published in JAMA Neurology revealed that patients with Alzheimer’s disease have significantly higher levels of DDE, the long-lasting metabolite of the pesticide DDT, in their blood than healthy people.

In a case-control study involving 86 Alzheimer’s patients and 79 healthy elderly controls, researchers found that DDE levels were almost four times higher in serum samples from Alzheimer’s patients than in controls. Having DDE levels in the highest third of the range in the study increased someone’s risk of Alzheimer’s by a factor of four.

This is one of the first studies identifying a strong environmental risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease. The magnitude of the effect is strikingly large,  it is comparable in size to the most common genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s.

This free test can spot early signs of dementia

dementia test

This test can be completed online or by hand which tests language ability, reasoning, problem solving skills and memory. Results can then be shared with doctors to help spot early symptoms of cognitive issues such as early dementia or Alzheimer’s disease.

Around 800,000 people in Britain are currently suffering from dementia in Britain with more than a million expected by 2021.

Currently Alzheimer’s is only diagnosed through in depth cognitive testing, but researchers said the simple test worked equally well.

The research was published in The Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences.

One book that will change how you look for care homes

Best Guide to UK Care Homes‘ is the book that you cannot afford to miss in 2014!

best uk care homes guide 2014

This copy, which is the No. 1 recommended guide by various UK Care Homes experts, has been completely updated and revised for 2014. Written by 3 leading care home experts from Harvard University, the London School of Economics and myself, this volume covers all the key questions concerning various elderly care options available in the UK today, choosing different types of care, care funding advice, care home check-list and FAQs.

It is available in the Top 10 best-sellers under ‘Ageing Parents’ category on Amazon now. The book has special Kindle enabled features. However, this copy does NOT require an Amazon kindle device. It can be read on your computer, or even on your iPhone, or Blackberry, or Android phone, or Windows 7 phone, or any tablet devices!

Care Home Search Rise in January

A recent study shows that there has been a steep increase in the number of care home searchers  after the Christmas period for the past three years.Grandparents leaving for care homes in the new year

 

Families get together over the Christmas holiday, they might realise that an elderly relative is no longer able to cope on their own.

 

Families are becoming more involved in the life of an older person nowadays. Since 2010, there has been a growing number of people visiting care homes in January. Last year alone, it noted almost 400,000 additional visits extra of the normal visits.

Peanut butter, a quick test for Alzheimer’s

You may not have heard of ‘the peanut butter test’, but it could become a fantastically low-cost and non-invasive way to test for Alzheimer’s. After all, what’s less invasive than asking someone to smell some delicious peanut butter? ‘The ability to smell is associated with the first cranial nerve and is often one of the first things to be affected in cognitive decline,’  according to a report from the University of Florida, researchers from which conducted the experiment.  But with Alzheimer’s patients, the sense of smell is affected in a very particular way: The left nostril is significantly more impaired than the right. Weird! But true.care-home-peanut-butter

The experiment involved capping one nostril and measuring the distance at which the patient could detect about a tablespoon of peanut butter. In Alzheimer’s patients, the left nostril was impaired so thoroughly that, on average, it had 10 centimeters less range than the right, in terms of odor detection. That’s specific to Alzheimer’s patients; neither control patients (those not suffering from cognitive decline) nor those with other types of cognitive impairment (like dementia) demonstrated that nostril difference.

Peanut butter was used because it’s a so-called ‘pure odorant’. Generally our sense of smell actually incorporates two distinct sensations: the olfactory sense, or smell, as well as a trigeminal sense, which is like a more physical burning or stinging sort of sense. Peanut butter has no trigeminal element; it’s only olfactory, which makes it ideal for testing, as the link to Alzheimer’s is specifically dealing with the olfactory sense.

This could be a great, inexpensive, early warning system for those with Alzheimer’s; the illness is not easy to detect, requiring neurological examination as well as mental, and has to be carried out by a professional. The peanut butter test? Much easier.

 

Alzheimer’s cure is near

The discovery of the first chemical to prevent the death of brain tissue in a neuro-degenerative disease has been hailed as the ‘turning point’ in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. More work is needed to develop a drug that could be taken by patients. But scientists say a resulting medicine could treat Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s and other diseases.care-home-tea

Medical professor from University of London expresses that the finding is a turning point in medical history to control and prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Many other experts in the field also deem it as a landmark study.

When a virus hijacks a brain cell it leads to a build-up of viral proteins. Cell responds by shutting down nearly all protein production in order to halt the virus’s spread. However, many neurodegenerative diseases involve the production of faulty or misfolded proteins. These activate the same defences, but with more severe consequences.

The director of research at the charity Alzheimer’s Research UK stresses that targeting a mechanism relevant to a number of neurodegenerative diseases could yield a single drug with wide-reaching benefits, but this compound is till at an early stage.

Tips for finding the right care home from industry insider Janis McFarlane

What do you enjoy the most about working in care home industry?
I enjoy working with people from all walks of life, residents and their families, managers and staff and related health professionals. No two days are ever the same; each day brings something different and a new challenge to be solved. I particularly enjoy teaching staff and showing them that excellent quality care can and is provided within care homes. Observing staff develop their confidence, skills and meaningful relations with residents brings a smile to my face and gives me the “oomph” to carry on promoting care in care homes, deal with suppliers, develop policies and manage the accounts!

What are the most important qualities a care home professional should have?Apartment building in the city with a spectacular sky
A genuine desire to care, we can teach our staff many things including how to be a professional care person, we cannot teach staff how to be “caring” that is inbuilt in the person.
Respect for other peoples beliefs and choices in life whether we agree or not, being able to support someone to carry on with their wishes that you don’t personally agree with is difficult especially for young care givers.
Compassion, understanding and patience all very easy to say, but far more difficult to deliver if they are not inherent qualities.
The ability to work with the ethos, we work in our residents’ homes they do not live in our work place. Lastly, a sense of humour, the ability to enjoy and have pride in being a professional care giver is essential.
To all the people out there looking for a care home for themselves or their loved ones, what is the best advice you would offer? 
Visit many homes and visit the same home on different days at different times without the need for an appointment with the manager. Speak with residents of the home if possible; find out if they enjoy living there. Observe the staff interactions with the residents and go by your own instinct and feelings. Ask many questions and go prepared with a list of all you want to know no matter how trivial you may think they are, every little detail is important to you and your loved one.
If you were given money and resources to set up a research group, what would you research on the UK care home industry?
Where do all the teaspoons go? Only joking!
Possibly the healing of pressure ulcers that have not developed in the care home or the experiences of relatives concerning “a good death”. I think care homes bench mark themselves against external standards of other organisations and there are many areas of care that external organisations should bench mark against good care homes.

What is the key issue facing the care home industry in this country?
Finance, sustainability and a wider understanding publically of what we do well, what we are expected and required to do, what we wish to do and the financial restraints we face in being able to deliver what we are capable of doing. We are caring for more complex care needs not just in elderly care, we have seen an increase in the need for care of younger people with long term complex needs as a result of trauma and substance misuse entering care homes, we can deliver the care, we can meet their needs however we need reasonable fee structures to enable us to do so. A healthy dose of respect for our services wouldn’t go amiss and whilst bad news sells newspapers a readdressing of the balance of good news stories would be appreciated!

care-home-Janis McFarlane

Janis McFarlane has worked in the care sector for 33 years, she was also trained as a registered general nurse in Fife and worked within the NHS in Fife and Forth Valley in acute areas before embarking on a journey over the last 23 years within the independent care sector that has seen many, many changes in that time. During that time, she has worked as a home manager, regional and senior regional manager and her current role is Director of Operations with The Holmes Care (Group) Ltd. Her passion is end of life care, we don’t get a second chance to get this right, and to be with someone at the end of their life is a privilege. Her aim is to continue to break down myths and barriers surrounding what happens in a care home and to facilitate our managers and their teams through learning and empowerment to provide the very best experience and memories for residents and their families that we possibly can.

Have you found your care home in August?

Have you found your care home in August? CareHomesJournal aims to bring you the latest news of your interest!